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Thread: Anandtech News

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    #4601

    Anandtech: Lenovo Updates The Yoga Family At CES

    Lenovo launched the new Yoga 3 Pro back in October 2014, with a watch band hinge and Core-M under the hood. Today the rest of the Yoga laptop line gets a refresh and some new models. In addition, the ThinkPad Yoga is also getting a processor refresh courtesy of Broadwell, and Lenovo is also offering the latest Yoga Tablet 2 with AnyPen technology.
    Starting with the tablet, the Yoga Tablet 2 is a Windows based tablet with the Lenovo Yoga hinge. On their tablet lines, the hinge is a smaller version but the increased volume allows Lenovo to pack the hinge with a much larger battery than would be otherwise possible. It offers Hold, Stand, Tilt, and Hang modes. The Yoga Tablet 2 also offers front facing stereo speakers and Dolby audio. Powering the Yoga Tablet 2 is an Intel Atom processor, and the 8” display is 1080p which should give good clarity. The battery life is rated at 15 hours due to the extra battery space in the hinge.
    The interesting feature of the Yoga Tablet 2 is the AnyPen technology, which allows any pen or pencil to be used as a handwriting tool. A dedicated stylus is not required. Basically any writing tool with a conductive end will work with the digitizer. At this point, it would seem odd to write on your tablet with a pencil, but assuming the display does not get marked up with the writing tool it should work well.
    Next up is the Yoga 3 notebook. The Yoga series is based on the same 360 degree hinge as the other Yogas, however due to the lower price point of the Yoga vs Yoga Pro there is no watch band on this model. The 11 inch version has been updated and also added to the lineup is a 14 inch model, with up to Core i7 5th generation processors (Broadwell-U). The displays are 1080p with touch, and 802.11ac Wi-Fi is standard which will put to rest my biggest complaint with the Yoga 2 Pro. All are offered with backlit keyboards, and the devices are around 18.3 mm thick. Lenovo has also reworked the hinge to allow a smoother opening and to let the laptop lay flat when opened to 180 degrees. Lenovo has equipped the Yoga with Wave speakers which automatically adjust based on how the device is current being used (ie Stand, Tent, Laptop, Tablet) and several new colors are being added to the mix. The Yoga series is now available in Platinum Silver, Ebony Black, Chalk White, and Clementine Orange.
    The business line for the Yoga is unsurprisingly the ThinkPad Yoga. 2014 offered a single ThinkPad Yoga with a 12.5 inch display, and for this year Lenovo is increasing their portfolio to include a new 14 and 15 inch model. The 15 inch model will also be available with an optional Intel RealSense 3D Camera system, and several models can also be had with an active digitizer, with an internal garage for the pen. Powering the new ThinkPad Yoga is the 5th Generation Intel Core processors as well, so none of the ThinkPad line will be available with the lower performance Core-M at this time.
    The Yoga Tablet 2 8 inch model will be available starting this month for $299. The Yoga 3 11 inch has a base price of $799, and the Yoga 3 14 inch starts at $979. Both are available in March. The ThinkPad Yoga will be available starting at $1199 in May of this year.
    As a fan of the Yoga series, I look forward to seeing these devices at CES this week. We will hopefully be able to provide hands-on updates when we get to the Lenovo booth, and look for review units after that.
    Source: Lenovo




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    #4602

    Anandtech: Zotac ZBOX CI320 nano Review: A Fanless Bay Trail-M mini-PC

    Over the last couple of years, mini-PCs in the ultra-compact form factor (UCFF) have emerged as one of the bright spots in the troubled PC market. Zotac is no stranger to this segment. In fact, their nano xs units came to the market before the Intel NUC, even though the NUC is credited with kickstarting the UCFF trend. Intel's Bay Trail family of SoCs has proved to be an affordable and low-power candidate for UCFF PC units. We have already evaluated a couple - an actively cooled GIGABYTE BXBT-1900 and and the fanless ECS LIVA. This review provides some insights into what the passively cooled Zotac ZBOX CI320 nano brings to the market.

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    #4603

    Anandtech: Synology's BeyondCloud Series - NAS Units made User-Friendly

    Synology has put out some interesting updates (both expected as well as unexpected) in the lead up to the new year. At CES 2015, the focus is on a new series of NAS units to complement the traditional Disk Station (DS) lineup. The BeyondCloud (BC) package takes the traditional DS unit, preconfigures it with disks and sets up an appropriate volume. Certain packages (such as the multimedia-focused Photo Station and Video Station) are also pre-installed.
    Newly purchased BeyondCloud NAS units are up and running immediately after purchase. As I have mentioned before in previous Synology reviews, setting up a JBOD or RAID-1 volume with fresh raw disks involves optimization of the configured file system. It often takes the better part of a day. The BeyondCloud series manages to hasten the setup process, and it is particularly useful for SMBs and busy tech-savvy users
    On the other end of the spectrum, we have this new lineup making NAS units more friendly to the average consumer - those who are not comfortable with aspects such as shared folders and mapping network drives. In this area, I think Synology has a chance to jostle for space with the Western Digital EX2, Seagate Personal Cloud, LenovoEMC EZ Backup and Media Center and other such products which come with disks pre-installed and target home users. Given the ease of use of the DSM UI, home consumers should find the BC series a welcome competitor in this space.
    The BC series currently has three members:

    • BC115j 1200: 1-bay, 2TB hard disk pre-installed for $180
    • BC115j 1300: 1-bay, 3TB hard disk pre-installed for $240
    • BC214se 2300: 2-bay, 2x 3TB hard disks in RAID-1 for $370

    The units are based on the DS115j and the DS214se. Both of them have a Marvell ARMADA 370 as the main SoC. The concept is great (albeit one that Western Digital and Seagate have already implemented in their consumer-focused personal cloud solutions). Synology can differentiate a bit by offering higher-end systems (4- and 5-bay ones) in a BeyondCloud configuration.
    We met up with Synology at Pepcom, and they had the units on display, along with the SMB-focused DS2015xs and the DS414slim. On the CES show floor, they will also be having demonstrations of the new Surveillance Station (which doesn't require Java on the client systems anymore) as well as other features of the latest DSM.



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    #4604

    Anandtech: As mainstream as it gets: Corsair announces the Carbine 100R case

    Two years ago, Corsair released the Carbide 200R and the $59 case proved to be a remarkable budget-friendly solution. Back then we were wondering "how low can you go" and the Carbide 200R served as the least expensive enclosure Corsair had in their ranks for a long time. That changes today, as Corsair announced the 100R, a slightly smaller version of the 200R that has a MSRP of $49. The small 100R can still hold normal ATX motherboards and PSUs, as well as 5.25" devices and up to four 3.5" drives.
    The 100R will be available in two versions. The windowed and windowless (silent) versions will have an MSRP of $49 and $59 respectively. No, that is not a typo, the windowless version is a little more expensive because it includes a layer of sound-dampening material. Visually, the 100R is very similar to its larger, older brother, the 200R. From the pictures that Corsair provides with their press release, we can tell that the major differences lie with the drive cages; there is one less 5.25" bay and the 3.5" cage has been remodeled to use plastic trays. The top exhaust fans are limited to 120mm as well, but they ought to be more than sufficient for a budget-level system.
    Gallery: Corsair Carbide 100R


    Gallery: Corsair Carbide 100R Silent Edition


    "The Carbide 100R shatters the stereotype that budget-friendly cases have to be gaudy and poorly designed, " said George Makris, Product Manager for Cases and Cooling at Corsair. "Now gamers and PC enthusiasts have a subtle, functional, and affordable foundation for their next PC." A presentation of the 100R by George Makris can be seen in the following video.


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    #4605

    Anandtech: Corsair Debuts the Hydro H110i GT AIO Cooler and HG10 N780 Edition GPU Coo

    Corsair decided to up the stakes in the AIO liquid cooler market and is releasing the Hydro Series H110i GT cooler, an upgraded version of the H110 that we tested a year ago. The new H110i GT appears to be a mix of the 140mm X 280mm radiator from the H110 and the block-pump assembly from the H100i. There are aesthetic improvements as well, with logo inserts on the block and radiator, lighting of the logo on the pump and sleeved tubing. Finally, it will feature Corsair Link support and will have an MSRP of $129.99.
    Gallery: Hydro H110i GT AIO Cooler


    The company also presented an adaptation of the HG10 GPU Cooling Bracket for NVIDIA GeForce GPUs. The core concept of the HG10 N780 remains unchanged, as it has been simply modified in order to be compatible with reference design NVIDIA GeForce GTX 770, GTX 780, GTX 780 Ti, Titan and Titan Black graphics cards. The HG10 N780 is compatible with every Hydro Series AIO cooler. The HG10 N780 is compatible with every Hydro Series AIO cooler. Much like the normal version, the HG10 N780 will not only cool the GPU but the VRAM and VRMs of the latest NVIDIA cards as well. It will be available with an MSRP of $39.99.
    Gallery: HG10 N780 Edition GPU Cooling Bracket





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    #4606

    Anandtech: MHL Consortium Announces superMHL: New Standard & New Cable To Drive 8K TV

    When the Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) was introduced in 2010, it was created to solve a simple but none the less daunting problem: how to get power in and digital video out of cell phones and other mobile devices without requiring additional (or more complex) ports, such as what would be required for HDMI. The solution developed by Silicon Image and the MHL Consortium members was the ultimate piggy-back solution, devising a method to handle power and video using just 5 pins (the number of pins in a mini/micro-USB 2.0 connector) and connecting it to MHL-compliant TVs via their HDMI ports. MHL had no port or cable to call its own, but it had an altered protocol based on the same TMDS technology behind HDMI that made it possible to get video off of mobile devices.
    Flash forward a few years, and while there have been successive versions of MHL – the most recent being MHL 3 – all of these have built on the original design principles of MHL, focusing on the Mobile part of Mobile High-Definition Link while improving the specification. For this reason it came as quite a surprise to us this week when we found out that the MHL consortium was planning on taking MHL beyond its mobile roots and moving into the TV space, greatly extending the features and use cases in the process. With a mandate to provide a cable for 8K video at up to 120fps, MHL is no longer aiming low; with today’s announcement of superMHL, MHL is now aiming for nothing less than the top.
    superMHL in a nutshell is a pair of improvements to the MHL specification to further improve mobile connectivity and to enable 8K video. First and foremost, the protocol itself is being improved: superMHL doubles the amount of bandwidth available over a single lane to allow for 4Kp60 video, along with defining support for deep color modes (10/12/16bit) and newer color spaces. This alone would be a notable improvement to MHL, especially as H.265 capable phones being to hit the market and the H.265 backers are pushing 4Kp60 video and 10-bit color themselves, necessitating a video interface capable of delivering that data.
    MHL Specification Comparison
    superMHL (6 Lanes) superMHL (1 Lane) MHL 3 (1 Lane)
    Maximum Resoluion 8Kp120, 4:2:0 36-bit color 4Kp60 4Kp30
    Deep Color Support Yes Yes No
    Power Charging 40W Up To 40W, Depending On Cable 10W
    Requires superMHL Cable Yes No No
    However the more dramatic change is in the second improvement coming to superMHL, which is the introduction of the superMHL cable and connector. This unusual development was spurred on by the television manufacturing members of the MHL Consortium, who in developing their future 8K (7680x4320) televisions wanted a single cable that could carry the enormous amount of data required for 8K video with deep color and high frame rates. Compounding matters, the usual TV connector of choice, HDMI, was not going to be ready for the job, as HDMI 2.0 was only planned for up to 4Kp60 video. Consequently TV manufacturers turned to the MHL Consortium, who became tasked with developing a cable and connector standard for 8K video.
    The Consortium’s solution was the suitably named superMHL connector. A reversible connector containing 32 pins, the superMHL is among the densest digital video connectors ever devised, packing those 32 pins in a space roughly the same size as the 19 pin HDMI Type-A cable. With 32 pins the superMHL connector would be capable of carrying 6 lanes of MHL data as opposed to 1 lane on a traditional MHL setup, providing the necessary bandwidth for 8K video, and capable of carrying it two to three meters over a standard (passive) cable.
    By going this route the MHL standard now serves two masters, mobile and the home, and consequently the standard now covers a much wider range of use cases and potential configurations. superMHL-to-superMHL cables will be the cable necessary for 8K video, and meanwhile USB to HDMI cables will continue to support mobile devices.
    Overall the superMHL standard allows for ether the traditional HDMI connector or the new superMHL connector as a “sink” connector, and no fewer than 3 “source” connectors. Joining the regular micro-USB as a source, USB type-C and the superMHL connector are now supported as source connectors as well. Of these combinations we expect superMHL to superMHL and USB to HDMI will be the most common, especially since 4K TVs can still go ahead and implement superMHL protocol support for 4Kp60 video without using a superMHL port. However if superMHL ports on TVs gain traction, then direct USB to superMHL would become increasingly viable. Meanwhile for USB Type-C in particular, thanks to the Type-C’s alternate mode support, Type-C to superMHL will be able to support 2 or 4 MHL data lanes (versus 1 for micro-USB), leaving the door open to potential mid-bandwidth use cases in the future.
    Finally, along with the changes to the MHL protocol and physical interface, for superMHL the standard is also having its power and multi-display limits increased. superMHL power delivery will allow for up to 40W (20V @ 2A) versus MHL 3’s 10W, which will allow MHL connections to carry enough power to not just run tablets but to charge them as well. Meanwhile, though currently rarely used in any form, superMHL increases the number of displays allowed in an MHL multi-display configuration to 8 displays, thanks in large part to the bandwidth increases.
    Ultimately today’s announcement from the MHL Consortium marks an interesting turn of events in what has otherwise been a complementary relationship between MHL and HDMI. Though this doesn’t make the standards competing standards – especially not when both are based on TMDS technology and both have TMDS owner Silicon Image among their members – this does for the first time create a real degree of overlap between the two. MHL’s place in mobile is as secure as it ever was, but what will come of their home/TV efforts remains to be seen.
    At least in the short term superMHL will be the only option for 8K TV, and in fact Samsung already has an 8K TV with superMHL up and running for CES. But how long it superMHL remains the only option for 8K is another matter entirely. Even outside of its higher bandwidth support, superMHL has some other technological advantages such as the reversible connector and the ability to carry power which give it an advantage over HDMI for 4K video, but for most cases this is not going to be a massive advantage.
    In any case, ignoring the HDMI overlap for the time being, superMHL should still bring tangible benefits for both of its primary markets. With an upgraded protocol capable of supporting 4Kp60, MHL is better than ever for traditional mobile applications. Meanwhile with the new superMHL cable and connector, TV manufacturers eager to get 8K TVs out the door will finally have a single cable standard to drive those TVs with.
    Gallery: MHL Consortium Announces superMHL: New Standard & New Cable To Drive 8K TV




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    #4607

    Anandtech: HTC Announces the Desire 826

    Yesterday at CES, HTC announced the newest device in their lineup of Desire smartphones. Years ago, HTC's flagship devices fell under the Desire brand. In recent years, the Desire brand has been shifted to more budget oriented devices. This new HTC smartphone is the Desire 826, and it follows in the footsteps of the Desire 816 and Desire 820 that came before it. Although it isn't HTC's flagship smartphone, it still has respectable specifications, and in many ways is not far off from today's flagship devices. I've laid out the key specifications of the Desire 826 below.
    HTC Desire 826
    SoC Qualcomm Snapdragon 615, 4 x Cortex A53 at 1.7GHz + 4 x Cortex A53 at 1.0GHz,
    Adreno 405 GPU
    Memory and Storage 16GB NAND + MicroSDXC, 2GB LPDDR3
    Display 5.5” 1920x1080 LCD
    Cellular Connectivity 2G / 3G / 4G LTE (Qualcomm MDM9x25 UE Category 4 LTE)
    Dimensions 158 x 77.5 x 7.99 mm, 183g
    Camera 13 MP f/2.2 Rear Facing, 4MP UltraPixel f/2.0 Front Facing or 13MP f/2.0 Front Facing
    Battery 2600 mAh (9.88 Whr)
    Other Connectivity 802.11 a/b/g/n + BT 4.1, AptX, USB2.0, GPS/GNSS, NFC (in select regions)
    SIM Size Nano SIM (Dual SIM SKU available)
    Operating System Android 5.0 KitKat with HTC Sense
    The Desire 826 has a lot in common with the Desire 820 that was released in September 2014. Both devices use Qualcomm's Snapdragon 615 with 2GB of LPDDR3 memory, 16GB of NAND, and 2600mAh (9.88Wh) battery. However, the Desire 826 has a maximum clock speed of 1.7GHz on its high-power A53 cluster, while the Desire 820 was limited to 1.5GHz. Being an Android 5.0 Lollipop device, the Desire 826 will also be 64-bit enabled out of the gate, while the Desire 820 had to operate in 32-bit mode due to a 64-bit version of Android being unavailable. I still believe having two clusters of Cortex-A53s is silly, but HTC weren't the ones making that decision so it's not something I can really fault the phone itself for.

    There are some other notable improvements over the Desire 820. The Desire 826 has a significantly sharper display due to HTC's move from 1280x720 to 1920x1080 on the same panel size. The front-facing camera is the other significant difference between the two devices. While the Desire 820 used an 8MP front-facing sensor, the Desire 826 uses a 4MP UltraPixel sensor with an f/2.0 aperture for the front-facing camera in most markets. This should significantly improve low-light camera performance. In certain unspecified markets, the Desire 826 will use a 13MP f/2.0 sensor instead. Like all of HTC's recent devices, the Desire 826 ships with HTC's Eye Experience software for the camera.
    The Desire 826 will be available in the Asia-Pacific region by the end of this month, and will expand to other markets afterward. It comes in multiple colors, including but not limited to white, purple, and blue. There is currently no word on what to expect for pricing, but it should be similar to the launch price of the Desire 820.


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    #4608

    Anandtech: TP-LINK's Networking Solutions at CES 2015

    TP-LINK is one of the leading networking solutions vendor in the Asian market. They have been slowly trying to build up a presence in the US, but there has always been a bit of a delay between the launch in the North American market compared to the Asian one. TP-LINK has traditionally worked closely with Qualcomm Atheros, often being one of the first vendors to prepare solutions based on the QCA platforms.
    At CES 2015, TP-LINK became one of the first vendors to launch a 4x4 MU-MIMO-capable 802.11ac router with the QCA9980 platform. As of the end of last year, Quantenna was the only vendor with a shipping 4x4 MU-MIMO solution. However, this CES has seen the launch / customer shipment of 4x4 MU-MIMO 802.11ac solutions from Qualcomm Atheros, Broadcom and Marvell. We will have a separate piece comparing the various solutions. With reference to TP-LINK, the QCA9980 finds a place in the Archer AC2600. The unit also sports USB 3.0 ports, and other features are what is standard for a flagship model.
    The Broadcom Xstream platform does find a place in the Archer AC3200. With two 5 GHz radios and a single 2.4 GHz radio, this is the same platform that other vendors are already using (Netgear seems to have had an exclusive for a few months with the Nighthawk X6 R8000).
    On the powerline side, TP-LINK is staying with Qualcomm Atheros for the AV1200 HomePlug AV2 with MIMO solution. The TL-PA8030 can deliver 1.2 Gbps of throughput theoretically and sports three gigabit ports. It can use all three prongs (power, ground and neutral) for data transmission.
    The announced products are slated to appear in the market in Q3 2015.



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    #4609

    Anandtech: Seagate and LaCie at CES 2015

    Seagate acquired LaCie a couple of years back. We saw some complementary product lineups last year, but this time around, the integration seems to be well and truly complete. Amongst the new products introduced at CES 2015, the most interesting seemed to be the 7mm thin external USB 3.0 hard drive.
    The Seagate Seven is based on a 500 GB 5mm 2.5" Angsana drive (two platters). The SATA-USB 3.0 bridge has been integrated on the main board. A premium steel enclosure creates a unique and striking product at a reasonable $100 price point.
    The Seagate Wireless product is an low-cost entry update to the wireless mobile storage lineup for smartphones and tablets. The USB 3.0-based Seagate Wireless Plus and the LaCie Fuel will continue to exist. The new product is USB 2.0-based and has only one available capacity point - 500 GB. It is priced at $129. Unlike the My Passport Wireless that we reviewed late last year, this one doesn't have a SD card slot - the content consumption side is the target market here. Seagate had a handy comparison table in their briefing.
    The Seagate Personal Cloud is a NAS lineup targeted towards the average home consumer. It comes in 1 and 2-bay varieties. The mobile apps are the focus here - primary target market being owners with media libraries that need to be streamed to a variety of devices. Seagate operates relay servers with end-to-end encryption so that access to the content on the device is available from anywhere in the world. The various models and price points, as well as the competitive positioning are reproduced below.
    On the LaCie side of things, we had the usual fashion statement in the LaCie Mirror - an external 1TB 2.5" USB 3.0 drive that can double up as a mirror. It carries a premium, as usual, with the pricing set at $280. The more exciting product from a technical viewpoint was the LaCie Rugged RAID. The industrial design is almost the same as the LaCie Rugged Thunderbolt that we had reviewed last year. The thickness is more to accommodate two 2.5" drives, and there is a switch to move between RAID 0 and RAID 1 for the internal volume. The device comes with two hard drives. A dual SSD option was ruled out since Thunderbolt and USB 3.0 don't support more than 10 W over the bus.
    The pricing of the 4TB version (2x 2TB drives inside) will be $450. Advertised performance numbers include speeds of over 240 MBps in RAID 0. Similar to the Rugged Thunderbolt, the unit is shock, dust and splash-proof, and carries an IP54 rating.
    On the enterprise side of things, we finally got a look at the Seagate Kinetic Ethernet-Attached Hard Drive. As a quick introduction, the unit does away with the need for a separate NAS server by presenting two Ethernet links over what looks like a SATA connector. Object-based storage removes lots of overhead. Seagate indicated a growing number of chassis vendors with support for these drives. We hope to do a more detailed investigation into Kinetic in the near future.
    Seagate also had a demonstration of a ClusterStor unit from their Xyratex acquisition. Kristian will be covering updates from the SandForce division later this week.


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    #4610

    Anandtech: CES 2015 Lenovo Hands On

    Lenovo launched several new devices at CES with a push to Broadwell across the lineup of PCs. The ThinkPad X1 Carbon, X250, T550, T450s, E550, E450, and L450 all got bumps to Broadwell-U. The ThinkPad Yoga also got a spec bump, and several more versions of it were announced. Likely the most exciting announcement from Lenovo was the LaVie launch. We got a chance yesterday to look around the Lenovo booth and get some hands on time with the devices.
    The first thing in the Lenovo room is the 100 millionth ThinkPad ever built – a ThinkPad X1 Carbon named Eve. The ThinkPad brand has been around a long time, so congratulations to Lenovo on the achievement.
    Next we got to check out the ThinkPad Carbon X1. While mostly a spec bump over last year’s model, Lenovo did get rid of the adaptive function keys and brought back the TrackPoint buttons which should make fans for the series happy.
    The ThinkPad Yoga line got a large boost in numbers, moving from just a single 12.5” model to three models, with a 14” and 15” model made available. The 15” model is downright massive for a Yoga, but it does come with an optional Intel RealSense 3D camera system. While applications that leverage the camera system are sparse right now, in order for there to be an ecosystem around it, the hardware needs to be there. Lenovo did have some demo software which showed how the camera system could track points on your fingers in real time.
    Lenovo has often offered an active digitizer on many of its models, and they also demonstrated some new software that they are developing to extend the use of the pen when it is in use. They feel that if you are using the pen, you should be able to use it as the primary input method so they were working on software to do character recognition with the pen in places like the search box. Although the software was in early stages, it did eliminate the touch keyboard taking up a large portion of the screen when text entry was needed.
    Also new to the ThinkPad Yoga 15 was the Intel RealSense 3D camera system which was demoed.
    The Yoga 3 series was also released, and this series is a slightly less expensive take on the Yoga 3 Pro. We got a chance to see both the Yoga 3 11 and Yoga 3 14. As with most 2-in-1 models, the large displays can make them a bit unwieldy when being used as a tablet but are generally better than the smaller models when used more like a traditional notebook. I will never complain about having more options though and personally I find the stand mode very useful.
    Gallery: CES 2015 Lenovo Hands On


    Moving away from the Yoga series, we can still see its impact on the rest of the Lenovo lineup. The Flex 13 is a low cost version of the Yoga, with lower specs, but keeps the 360 degree hinge. Also on the consumer side Lenovo showed off its S41 and U31 models, which both have a white metal finish and 14 and 13 inch displays respectively.
    Gallery: CES 2015 Lenovo Hands On Flex S, and U


    Likely the most exciting thing at the Lenovo booth was the new LaVie series. The models on display are branded as NEC (NEC and Lenovo partnered on these) but they will be branded as Lenovo in other parts of the world. It was fairly stunning to pick one up and see just how light a 1.7 lb laptop is. The lower end version is rated by Lenovo at 5.9 hours of battery life, while the slightly heavier 2-in-1 version was rated up to 9 hours. The 2-in-1 version on display did have the 360 degree hinge, but it did not support Stand mode. It does have a gyroscope so it would seem likely this will be added on when it is closer to release.
    Gallery: CES 2015 Lenovo Hands On LaVie Series


    Hopefully we will be able to get some of these in for review. Stay tuned!


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