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Thread: Anandtech News

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    #7001

    Anandtech: Fractal Design Unveils Focus G Series Cases

    Fractal Design has just launched two new cases under the banner of the new Focus G series. The Focus G is a standard ATX mid-tower, while the Focus G Mini features a more compact footprint and is intended for Micro-ATX and Mini-ITX builds. While both models will be offered in black, the larger Focus G will also be offered in white and a brand new choice of Gunmetal Gray, Mystic Red, and Petrol Blue. This multiple color option is a first for Fractal Design.
    The Focus G series is manufactured using a combination of steel and plastic as you would expect from a cost-conscious case series. What you wouldn't necessarily expect in 2017 are the two external 5.25” drive bays. Size and color differences aside, these two models are effectively twins and they share numerous key features.
    Both cases have a large side panel window, removeable and vibration dampened storage drive bays, 18mm to 25mm of cable routing room behind the motherboard tray, and a front I/O panel that includes one USB 3.0 port, USB 2.0 port, and two audio jacks. When it comes to fans, both models have a total of six 120mm fan mounts, four of which can also hold 140mm fans (three on the Focus G Mini). There are removable dust filters everywhere but the rear. Fractal Design has included two front-mounted Silent Series LL 120mm LED fans that glow white light through the front mesh.
    Fractal Design Focus G Series
    Focus G Focus G Mini
    Motherboard Size ATX, Micro-ATX, Mini-ITX Micro-ATX, Mini-ITX
    Drive Bays External - -
    Internal 2 × 2.5" or 3.5" and 1 × 2.5" 2 × 2.5" or 3.5" and 1 × 2.5"
    AIB Bays Internal 7, up to 380 mm cards are supported 4, up to 380 mm cards are supported
    Cooling Front 2 × 120 mm or 2 × 140 mm 2 × 120 mm or 1 × 140 mm
    Rear 1 × 120 mm 1 × 120 mm
    Top 2 × 120 mm or 2 × 140 mm 2 × 120 mm or 2 × 140 mm
    Middle - -
    Bottom 1 × 120 mm 1 × 120 mm
    Radiator Support Front 1 × 120/240 mm or 140/280 mm 1 × 120/240 mm or 140 mm
    Rear 1 × 120 mm 1 × 120 mm
    Top 1 × 240 mm 1 × 240 mm
    Middle - -
    Bottom - -
    I/O Port 1 × USB 2.0
    1 × USB 3.0
    1 × Headphone
    1 × Mic
    1 × USB 2.0
    1 × USB 3.0
    1 × Headphone
    1 × Mic
    Power Supply Size Up to 230 mm Up to 230 mm
    Dimensions - -
    Colors Multiple colors Black
    Features Large side window panel Large side window panel
    Price $49.99 $49.99
    These Focus G series models also have extensive liquid cooling support, with radiator mounts in the front, rear, and the top of the cases. Those more interested in air cooling will be able to fit heatsinks that are up to 165mm tall, which means just about every cooler on the market. Both models can also handle graphics cards up to 380mm long, while power supply depth is a very spacious 230mm. The other similarity is that both models are going to retail for $49.99 USD, which places them firmly in the competitive budget case market.
    We have no word on availability, but sometime after Computex is a firm bet.
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    Gallery: Focus G

    Gallery: Focus G Mini




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    #7002

    Anandtech: NVIDIA Announces GeForce MX150: Entry-Level Pascal for Laptops, Just in Ti

    This morning NVIDIA has taken the wraps off of a new video card for laptops, the GeForce MX150. Aimed at the entry-level market for discrete GPUs – that is, laptops that need performance only a bit above an integrated GPU – the MX150 is NVIDIA’s Pascal-based successor to the previous 930M/940M series of laptop adapters that have been in computers over the last couple of years. Today’s reveal is undoubtedly tied to next week’s Computex trade show, so we should expect to see a number of laptops using the new adapter announced in the coming days.
    From a technical perspective, details on the GeForce MX150 are very limited. Traditionally NVIDIA does not publish much in the way of details on their low-end laptop parts, and unfortunately the MX150’s launch isn’t any different. We’re still in the process of shaking down NVIDIA for more information, but what usually happens in these cases is that these low-end products don’t have strictly defined specifications. At a minimum, OEMs are allowed to dial in clockspeeds to meet their TDP and performance needs. However in prior generations we’ve also seen NVIDIA and OEMs use multiple GPUs under the same product name – mixing in GM107 and GM108, for example – so there’s also a strong possibility that will happen here as well.
    Officially, all NVIDIA says about the new video card is that it uses GDDR5 and that it offers around 33% better performance than the GeForce 940MX, a (typically) GM108-based product. Based on the market segment and NVIDIA’s recent activities in the desktop space, the “baseline” MX150 is without a doubt GP108, NVIDIA’s entry-level GPU that was just recently launched in the GeForce GT 1030 for desktops. Information about this chip is limited, but here’s my best guess for baselime MX150 specifications.
    [TABLE="align: center"]
    [TR="class: tgrey"]
    [TD="colspan: 5, align: center"]Best Guess: NVIDIA Laptop Video Card Specification Comparison[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR="class: tlblue"]
    [TD="class: contentwhite, width: 168, bgcolor: #016a96, align: center"] [/TD]
    [TD="class: contentwhite, width: 110, bgcolor: #016a96, align: center"]Typical MX150[/TD]
    [TD="class: contentwhite, width: 110, bgcolor: #016a96, align: center"]Typical 940MX[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="class: tlgrey"]CUDA Cores[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #f7f7f7, align: center"]384?[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #f7f7f7, align: center"]384[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="class: tlgrey"]ROPs[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #f7f7f7, align: center"]16[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #f7f7f7, align: center"]8[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="class: tlgrey"]Boost Clock[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #f7f7f7, align: center"]Variable[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #f7f7f7, align: center"]Variable[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="class: tlgrey"]Memory Type[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #f7f7f7, align: center"]GDDR5[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #f7f7f7, align: center"]GDDR5/DDR3[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="class: tlgrey"]Memory Bus Width[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #f7f7f7, align: center"]64-bit?[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #f7f7f7, align: center"]64-bit[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="class: tlgrey"]VRAM[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #f7f7f7, align: center"]

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    #7003

    Anandtech: AMD Announces Ryzen AGESA 1.0.0.6 Update: Enables Memory Clocks Up To DDR4

    Demonstrating their commitment to keep improving the AM4 platform, AMD has just published a suite of details that their upcoming AGESA 1.0.0.6 firmware. Of particular interest here, the latest firmware is going to enhance memory overclocking and compability, as well as add a much needed virtualization-related feature.
    AGESA is an acronym for “AMD Generic Encapsulated System Architecture", and it is essentially the foundational code on which BIOS files for AM4 motherboards are built. When the Ryzen AM4 platform was launched back in March, the early AGESA versions lacked a lot of the core capabilities and settings that we have come to expect from a modern platform. As a result, motherboard manufacturers did not have a lot to work with when it came to creating feature-rich custom BIOSes for their own motherboards. Since then AMD has been pretty vocal and proactive about fixing any bugs, opening up new BIOS features, and improving overclocking.
    With this new AGESA version, AMD has added 26 new memory-related parameters. The most dramatic improvement is the significant expansion of memory speed options. If we exclude base block overclocking - which relatively few motherboards support - the AM4 platform has thus far been effectively limited to memory speeds of DDR4-3200. Not only that, but the supported range of options from DDR4-1866 to DDR4-3200 was in large 266MT/s increments. With AGESA 1.0.0.6, memory frequencies have not only been expanded all the way up to DDR4-4000, but between DDR4-2667 and DDR4-4000 the increments have been reduced to 133MT/s. Not only does this mean that more memory kits will be able to be run at their rated speed - and not get kicked down to the nearest supported speed - but it also significantly reduces the high-speed memory gap that the AM4 platform had with Intel's mainstream LGA1151 platform.
    The other important announcement is the unlocking of about two dozen memory timings. Up until now, only five primary memory timings have been adjustable and there wasn't even a command rate option, which was natively locked to the most aggressive 1T setting. All of this should help improve overclocking and most importantly compatibility with large swathe of DDR4 memory kits that have largely been engineered with Intel platforms in mind.
    The last addition should excite those interested in virtualization. AMD has announced "fresh support" for PCI Express Access Control Services (ACS), which enables the ability to manually assign PCIe graphics cards within IOMMU groups. This should be a breath of fresh air to those who have previously tried to dedicate a GPU to a virtual machine on a Ryzen system, since it has thus far been fraught with difficulties.
    AMD has already distributed the AGESA 1.0.0.6 to its motherboard partners, so BIOS updates should be available starting in mid to late June. Having said that, there are apparently beta versions currently available for the ASUS Crosshair VI and GIGABYTE GA-AX370-Gaming 5.
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    #7004

    Anandtech: Lenovo’s Legion Gets Bigger with Y920: 17-inch G-SYNC, Core i7-K, GTX 1070

    Lenovo has expanded its lineup of Legion-branded gaming laptops with a model that features a 17” display, powerful audio, a mechanical keyboard, and an overclocking-capable Intel Core i7 microprocessor. The company positions its new gaming notebook for those who need maximum performance in a portable form-factor and will want to perform additional performance tuning.
    For the better part of its history, Lenovo has focused primarily on mainstream and business PCs in a bid to drive volume and become one of the largest suppliers of computers in the world. However, as sales of PCs stagnated or dropped in the recent years, Lenovo has had to find a new source for its growth. One angle to this is when the company started to build gamers-friendly machines. At first they were released under the Y-series, such as the Y-700, but earlier this year Lenovo introduced its gaming PC brand: the Legion. So far, the Legion lineup has included only two 15.6” laptop models — the Legion Y520 and the Legion Y720. This month, the company is rolling out a considerably more powerful addition to the series, the Legion Y920 with a larger screen and better hardware, targeting the higher-end segment of the gaming laptop market. The Legion Y920 may not be addressing the ultra-premium part of the market, but the machine demonstrates a clear trend where Lenovo is going with its gaming notebooks.
    The Lenovo Legion Y920 is equipped with a 17” FHD display with NVIDIA’s G-Sync and is powered by Intel’s Core i7-7820HK or Core i7-7700HQ processor (depending on exact SKU). The former processor features unlocked multiplier and thus can be overclocked rather easily as long as it has sufficient cooling. The laptop comes with 16 GB of DDR4 RAM, it uses NVIDIA’s GeForce GTX 1070 graphics adapter with 8 GB of GDDR5 memory as well as a 512 GB PCIe SSD and/or a 1 TB 2.5” HDD. As for connectivity, the Legion Y920 is equipped with one Thunderbolt 3 port, Rivet Networks’ Killer 2×2 802.11ac Wi-Fi and GbE, four USB 3.0 Type-A headers, a card reader, an HDMI header as well as a DisplayPort.

    Meanwhile, two features of the Y920 that Lenovo is especially proud of are the audio sub-system featuring two JBL speakers and a subwoofer that carries the Dolby Home Theatre badge as well as an RGB LED-backlit mechanical keyboard.
    Lenovo Legion Y920
    i7-7700HQ i7-7820K
    Display 17.3" IPS panel with 1920×1080 resolution and 75 Hz refresh
    CPU Core i7-7700HQ (4C/8T, 6 MB, 2.8/3.8GHz) Core i7-7820HK (4C/8T, 8 MB, 2.9/3.9GHz)
    Graphics NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 with G-Sync support
    RAM 16 GB DDR4
    Storage Up to 512 GB SATA SSD
    1 TB HDD (optional)
    Wi-Fi Rivet Killer Wireless-AC 2×2 802.11ac Wi-Fi
    Bluetooth Bluetooth 4.1
    Ethernet Rivet Killer E2x00 GbE controller
    USB 4
    × USB 3.0 Type-A
    Thunderbolt 1
    × USB Type-C Thunderbolt 3 connector
    Display Outputs 1
    × DisplayPort
    1
    × HDMI
    Keyboard Mechanical backlit keyboard with RGB LEDs and programmable buttons
    Audio 2
    × 2 W JBL speakers
    1
    × 3 W subwoofer
    Other I/O Microphone, audio jacks, webcam (720p), card reader
    Battery 90 Wh Li-Polymer
    Dimensions Width: 425 mm/16.7"
    Depth: 315 mm/12.4"
    Thickness: 36 mm/1.41"
    Weight 4.6 kilograms/10.14 lbs
    Price Starts at $2700 or €2600, depending on configuration and market
    With its 17” display, the Legion Y920 does not belong to what is now called ultra-portable gaming laptops category: it weighs 4.6 kilograms and its thickness is 36 mm, which is a result of using ABS plastic as the primary material for the chassis. Large dimensions enabled Lenovo to install a 90 Wh battery and could also let the manufacturer equip the laptop with a more advanced cooling system to boost overclocking potential of the Core i7-7820HK CPU. Unfortunately, Lenovo does not disclose any details about the cooling of the Legion Y920, but large dimensions, in general, mean more air.
    Lenovo’s Legion Y920 will hit the market in EMEA this month and will start from €2,599.99 (including VAT). The machine will be available in the U.S. in June for the price of $2,699.99 for the base configuration.

    Gallery: Lenovo Legion Y920


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