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    #9611

    Anandtech: Seasonic Readies Fanless Prime 700 W 80Plus Titanium PSU

    Seasonic demonstrated its upcoming Prime 700 W Titanium Fanless power supply at Computex. The PSU carries an 80Plus Titanium badge and will enable PC makers or enthusiasts to build whisper quite systems that still require lot of power.
    Seasonic’s Prime 700 W Titanium Fanless is a fully modular PSU compliant with ATX 2.4 as well as EPS (presumably v2.92) specifications, and equipped with two 4+4 CPU power connectors for 2P as well as HEDT motherboards. The power supply features high-quality aluminum capacitors, large heatsinks to cool down inductors as well as other components and supports Seasonic technologies such as MTLR (micro tolerance load regulation), and super low ripple noise (20 mV).
    When it comes to connectivity, the Prime 700 W Titanium Fanless has everything needed for a contemporary high-performance desktop, including auxiliary 8-pin PCIe connectors, SATA power plugs, Molex power outputs, and so on.
    To ensure safety, the PSU is equipped with over current, over power, over/under voltage, over temperature, and short circuit protection mechanisms. Meanwhile, to conform to the 80Plus Titanium requirements, the Prime TX-700 Fanless PSU is mandated to be at least 94% efficient under a 20%, 50% and 100% load as well as at least 90% efficient under a 10% load.
    Like all high-end PSUs from Seasonic, the Prime TX-700 Fanless will be covered with a 12-year warranty. Seasonic does not want to set a firm launch timeframe for its Prime 700 W Titanium Fanless power supply just yet, but it seems to be sure that it will be released later this year or in early 2020. As for pricing, expect it to cost more than today’s flagship Prime 600 W Titanium Fanless PSU.
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    #9612

    Anandtech: GIGABYTE X299G Designare-10G Motherboard: Dual 10G Ethernet

    GIGABYTE has released only a handful of its professional focused and creator-driven Designare branded motherboards, one for X299 and X399 for HEDT, as well as a Z390 version for desktop users. At Computex GIGABYTE unveiled its plans to launch a new variant, the X299G Designare-10G which drops flashy RGB LEDs, and opts for more professional features including dual 10 Gigabit ports.

    The X499 moniker on the heatsink is a name placeholder, not a confirmed chipset
    The GIGABYTE X299G Designare-10G is targeted at professional users, content creators and enthusiasts with its 12-phase power delivery, dual 8-pin 12 V ATX CPU power inputs, and four full-length PCIe 3.0 slots. It also marks a shift in the Designare range with more subtle and classier aesthetics with a black and silver chipset heatsink, black rear panel cover and black power delivery heatsinks.
    The X299G Designare-10G will also feature dual Intel 10 Gigabit ports (Intel X550-AT2 we believe) which is intent on making the board less focused on gaming, and more on performance. On top of this is an Intel AX200 802.11ax Wi-Fi 6 interface making this one of the most comprehensive consumer HEDT boards in regards to networking support. This intent is also prevalent in the design of the heatsinks with a comprehensive dual system with heat pipes extending from the audio PCB cover, the power delivery and all the way around to the chipset to provide better and more efficient cooling properties. While the bulk of the board's features and controller selection is currently unknown, the GIGABYTE X299G Designare-10G also includes rear panel support for Thunderbolt 3 devices, includes three PCIe 3.0 x4 M.2 slots each with their own individual heatsinks, and a total of eight SATA ports.
    Pricing and availability are currently unknown, but we were told that the new X299G range has been designed with the next-generation of Intel's Core-X processors expected to launch sometime in Q3; we expect more details to be unveiled in August.
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    #9613

    Anandtech: Spotted at Computex: An M.4 SSD with a PCIe 3.0 x8 Interface

    M.2 SSDs nowadays are used for a wide variety of applications, whereas Samsung tried to promote its next generation small form-factor (NGSFF) for enterprise-grade solid-state storage under the M.3 moniker (yet later renamed it to NF1). Apparently, there are companies that are working on SSDs in the so-called M.4 form-factor. One of such drives was spotted at Computex.
    Silicon Motion demonstrated Agylstor’s M.4 NVMe SSD at the trade show earlier this month. The drive is based on SMI’s own enterprise-grade SM2270 controller based on three pairs of ARM Cortex R5 cores to support 2KB LDPC error correction and featuring 16 NAND channels with 8 CE per channel (128 CE in total) as well as a PCIe 3.0 x8 interface. Meanwhile, the SSD was assembled by SMART Modular.
    Agylstor’s M.4 NVMe drive is essentially two M.2 SSDs (PCBs) glued together. The construction allows to install 16 NAND packages (eight on both sides) and thus offer an doubled capacity. Meanwhile, a PCIe 3.0 x8 interface promises a very strong performance. Keeping in mind that we are talking about an enterprise-grade controller and appropriate drives, we mean sustained performance, not peak performance.
    Agylstor is a startup that develops specialized storage subsystems for a wide variety of applications from drones to video & film production as well as from IoT to oil & gas exploration. That said, Agylstor does not necessarily need to make SSDs compatible with general-purpose PCs for many reasons.
    At present, it is unclear when Agylstor plans to release its M.4 NVMe SSDs.
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    #9614

    Anandtech: Phison Develops PS5017 Controller for SD Express & MicroSD Express Cards

    In order for the SD 7.0/7.1 (aka SD Express) ecosystem to take off, a number of things are needed, but aside from specification itself, availability of controllers for card readers as well as controllers for cards is crucial. Apparently, Phison had already developed its first controller for SD Express and microSD cards and even showcased prototypes of such cards at Computex.
    Phison’s PS5017 controller is compliant with the SD 7.1 specification, so it can be used both for SD Express and microSD Express cards. The chip supports various types of 3D TLC and 3D QLC NAND memory featuring ONFI or Toggle 2.0 interfaces, but total capacity is limited to 512 GB for some reason. Performance wise, the controller promises up to 900 MB/s sequential read speed as well as up to 500 MB/s sequential write speed, which is good enough considering types of memory that it will be used with.
    Since the company has not formally announced the PS5017 controller, it is likely that is has not passed all of required compliance tests just yet. Meanwhile, since the company showcases prototypes of cards as well as mentions the chip publicly, it is likely that it is in its final stages of development.
    While Phison does not announce any firm ETA dates for its PS5017, it looks like makers of SD Express and microSD Express cards will be able to buy it in the coming quarters.
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    #9615

    Anandtech: SilverStone’s 1000W SFX-L PSU: When Less Is More

    Back in the day, 1 kW PSUs were a prerogative of rather extreme high-end desktops carrying an overclocked CPU, a couple of graphics cards, several hard drives, and loads of other parts. Although there is a trend towards miniaturization of high-performance PCs, there is also a trend towards increasing their performance. Trying to strike a balance between smaller dimensions and higher power delivery, SilverStone has developed a 1 kW SFX-L PSU.
    SilverStone’s SST-SX1000-LPT is the world’s first SFX-L power supply that's rated for 1000 W. This is a fully modular PSU featuring compliant with the ATX 2.4 as well as EPS (presumably v2.92) specifications, and features a full suite of power connectors, ranging from ATX and EPS (for HEDT systems) to multiple power plugs for PCIe graphics cards and as SATA drives.
    The PSU can deliver up to 83.3 A over its 12V rail to power-hungry components, which is naturally its main selling feature. Another one is, of course, its high capacity for its size. The SX1000 has a 969 W per liter power-to-volume ratio, which SilverStone's highest to date. And even with all the work to build an electrically dense PSU, SilverStone hasn't skimped on overall power efficiency either; the active PFC PSU is 80 Plus Platinum badged.
    While SilverStone’s SST-SX1000-LPT PSU was demonstrated at this year's Computex, it is still pretty far from release. The company is looking at Q1 2020 as a possible release timeframe, with pricing information expected around that time as well.
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    #9616

    Anandtech: Azio’s Iris Keyboard: When Style Meets Comfort

    Azio demonstrated its Iris keyboard at Computex. The new product comes in two pieces that will be sold separately: the keyboard itself (dubbed K-Pad Unit) as well as a numpad (called N-Pad Unit). Traditionally for Azio, the Iris will use mechanical switches from Cherry.
    Azio’s Retro Classic mechanical keyboard featured a really eye-catching design with its typewriter-style round-shaped keys, yet many reviewers and users complained about its comfort back in 2017. Azio tried to capitalize on design of its Retro Classic products and introduced numerous new versions back at Computex 2018, though it looks like adoption of the product did not expand outside of its target audience (people primarily buying for style). That said, Azio decided to change its approach.
    Azio’s Iris keyboard uses more traditional square keycaps, which it meshes with a metallic finish as well as leather-covered body. At Computex, Azio demonstrated Iris in red & golden as well as black & silver colors, and the company may come up with other variants as well.
    The new Azio Iris keyboard also has a media control knob and uses Cherry’s Brown or Blue switchers. Just like in case of the Retro Classic, the keyboard is compatible both with Apple MacOS as well as Microsoft Windows-based PCs (i.e., ALT/Option as well as CMD/Windows keys are switchable). As for connectivity, both the keyboard and the numpad can connect to a PC using RF or Bluetooth technology, and they can be charged using USB Type-C connectors.
    Azio plans to start sales of its Iris keyboard and its keypad later this year. At present, the company is looking at $150 price point for the keyboard as well as $50 for the numpad, though this is subject to change. Furthermore, the company will offer mice that will match designs of its Iris units.
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    #9617

    Anandtech: Seagate Backup Plus Portable 5TB & Backup Plus Slim 2TB Review: SMR for th

    Hard drives continue to remain the storage media of choice for cost-conscious consumers with bulk storage requirements. HDD vendors have typically used their 2.5" drives for bus-powered high-capacity models. This market segment has been stuck at the 4TB mainstream capacity point for a few years now, with the z-height of the models coming in at well over 15mm. Earlier this year, Seagate announced an update to their massive 5TB Backup Plus Portable, while also introducing a new svelte 2TB Backup Plus Slim external hard drive. Both of them adopt SMR platters (similar to the Backup Plus models being sold since late 2016), and given the performance impact of SMR, today we'll be taking a detailed look at how SMR in bus-powered hard drives behaves for consumer workloads.

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    #9618

    Anandtech: ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming-ITX TB3: The Small Motherboard with a Side of E

    During Computex 2019, ASRock announced its upcoming X570 range ready for the launch of AMD's Ryzen 3000 series processors. One of the motherboard highlights of the show was the ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming-ITX TB3, which includes a very solid feature set including Thunderbolt 3 Type-C, a solid looking 10-phase power delivery, and a Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax wireless interface.
    The ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming-ITX TB3 joins a small handful of small form factor X570 models at launch but looks to stand-out from the crowd with a major feature; a Thunderbolt 3 Type-C connector on the rear panel. Following in line with the rest of its premium X570 product stack, ASRock has equipped the board with a hefty looking 10-phase power delivery, and official support for DDR4-4400 memory across two available slots. A single full-length PCIe 4.0 x16 slot is located at the bottom of the board, with a single PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 slot, and just four SATA ports. The networking is handled by an Intel Gigabit port, while the Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax wireless interface is controlled by the Killer AX1650 interface with support for BT 5 devices.
    On the rear panel alongside the single Thunderbolt 3 Type-C connector which is the highlight of the board, the ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming-ITX TB3 also includes a single USB 3.1 G2 Type-A, a single USB 3.1 G2 Type-C, and two USB 3.1 G1 Type-A ports. On the display model at Computex, there is a clear CMOS button, a DisplayPort input and HDMI video output, with a PS/2 combo port, and five 3.5 mm color coded audio jacks with a S/PDIF optical output due to the use of a Realtek ALC1220 HD audio codec.

    The specifications listed at Computex differ from what's actually featured physically on the rear panel. ASRock told us there were last minute changes.
    The availability and pricing of the ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming-ITX TB3 mini-ITX motherboard are currently unknown, but we expect it to launch with the rest of ASRock's announced X570 models on 7/7.
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    #9619

    Anandtech: NVIDIA G-Sync Ultimate Mini LED Monitors: From Acer & ASUS Later in 2019

    Known for its ability to build ecosystems around its products, NVIDIA rolled out a updated display-related initiative at this year’s Computex trade show. With the recent advent of commercial-scale miniaturized LEDs (Mini LEDs), NVIDIA and its partners are putting together a new generation of G-Sync Ultimate (HDR) monitors incorporating the smaller LEDs for use as backlighting. Similar to 2018's first-generation G-Sync Ultimate monitors, NVIDIA is working with Acer and ASUS on the monitors, which will pair a Mini LED-based (and quantum dot enhanced) backlighting system with 144 Hz IPS LCD panels. These 4K 27-inch LCDs are looking to iterate on previous designs by offering an even greater number of LED backlighting zones, further improving the monitors' contrast and reducing the remaining backlight bloom.
    Monitors based on the company’s Mini LED reference design will initially be available from Acer and ASUS. These 27-inch displays will feature a 576-zone Mini LED-based backlighting system, which is a 50% increase in zones over the first-generation 384-zone designs. And, like their predecessors, these new monitors will incorporate Full Array Local Dimming (FALD) for fine-grained backlighting control and improved contrast, and a quantum dot film layer for wide color reproduction. Specific color gamut coverage levels haven't been announced, but NVIDIA has confirmed that these monitors will peak at 1000 nits brightness (in HDR mode), the same as the earlier monitors. Past that, we're looking at the same general specs as the first-gen displays, with a 3840x2160 resolution panel that can go up to 144 Hz.
    The big question, of course, is pricing and availability. While NVIDIA is only responsible for the reference design and, officially at least, is deferring to Acer and ASUS on retail details, the company is all but promising that the Mini LED-based monitors will reach store shelves this year. As for pricing, that remains to be seen. The first-generation monitors already carried a hefty price tag of around $2000, and while this is a premium market, even higher price tags for the Mini LED Predator and ROG Swift PG27UQX may be hard to swallow. So hopefully Acer and ASUS are able to get these monitors on to the market at the same point where the first-generation monitors will leave off.
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    #9620

    Anandtech: PCI Express Bandwidth to Be Doubled Again: PCIe 6.0 Announced, Spec to Lan

    When the PCI Special Interest Group (PCI-SIG) first announced PCIe 4.0 a few years back, the group made it clear that they were not just going to make up for lost time after PCI 3.0, but that they were going to accelerate their development schedule to beat their old cadence. Since then the group has launched the final versions of the 4.0 and 5.0 specifications, and now with 5.0 only weeks old, the group is announcing today that they are already hard at work on the next version of the PCIe specification, PCIe 6.0. True to PCIe development iteration, the forthcoming standard will once again double the bandwidth of a PCIe slot – a x16 slot will now be able to hit a staggering 128GB/sec – with the group expecting to finalize the standard in 2021.
    As with the PCIe iterations before it, the impetus for PCIe 6.0 is simple: hardware vendors are always in need of more bandwidth, and the PCI-SIG is looking to stay ahead of the curve by providing timely increases in bandwidth. Furthermore in the last few years their efforts have taken on an increased level of importance as well, as other major interconnect standards are building off of PCIe. CCIX, Intel’s CXL, and other interfaces have all extended PCIe, and will in turn benefit from PCIe improvements. So PCIe speed boosts serve as the core of building ever-faster (and more interconnected) systems.
    PCIe 6.0, in turn, is easily the most important/most disruptive update to the PCIe standard since PCIe 3.0 almost a decade ago. To be sure, PCIe 6.0 remains backwards compatible with the 5 versions that have preceded it, and PCIe slots aren’t going anywhere. But with PCIe 4.0 & 5.0 already resulting in very tight signal requirements that have resulted in ever shorter trace length limits, simply doubling the transfer rate yet again isn’t necessarily the best way to go. Instead, the PCI-SIG is going to upend the signaling technology entirely, moving from the Non-Return-to-Zero (NRZ) tech used since the beginning, and to Pulse-Amplitude Modulation 4 (PAM4).
    At a very high level, what PAM4 does versus NRZ is to take a page from the MLC NAND playbook, and double the number of electrical states a single cell (or in this case, transmission) will hold. Rather than traditional 0/1 high/low signaling, PAM4 uses 4 signal levels, so that a signal can encode for four possible two-bit patterns: 00/01/10/11. This allows PAM4 to carry twice as much data as NRZ without having to double the transmission bandwidth, which for PCIe 6.0 would have resulted in a frequency around 30GHz(!).
    PAM4 itself is not a new technology, but up until now it’s been the domain of ultra-high-end networking standards like 200G Ethernet, where the amount of space available for more physical channels is even more limited. As a result, the industry already has a few years of experience working with the signaling standard, and with their own bandwidth needs continuing to grow, the PCI-SIG has decided to bring it inside the chassis by basing the next generation of PCIe upon it.
    The tradeoff for using PAM4 is of course cost. Even with its greater bandwidth per Hz, PAM4 currently costs more to implement at pretty much every level, from the PHY to the physical layer. Which is why it hasn’t taken the world by storm, and why NRZ continues to be used elsewhere. The sheer mass deployment scale of PCIe will of course help a lot here – economies of scale still count for a lot – but it will be interesting to see where things stand in a few years once PCI 6.0 is in the middle of ramping up.
    Meanwhile, not unlike the MLC NAND in my earlier analogy, because of the additional signal states a PAM4 signal itself is more fragile than a NRZ signal. And this means that along with PAM4, for the first time in PCIe’s history the standard is also getting Forward Error Correction (FEC). Living up to its name, Forward Error Correction is a means of correcting signal errors in a link by supplying a constant stream of error correction data, and it’s already commonly used in situations where data integrity is critical and there’s no time for a retransmission (such as DisplayPort 1.4 w/DSC). While FEC hasn’t been necessary for PCIe until now, PAM4’s fragility is going to change that. The inclusion of FEC shouldn’t make a noticeable difference to end-users, but for the PCI-SIG it’s another design requirement to contend with. In particular, the group needs to make sure that their FEC implementation is low-latency while still being appropriately robust, as PCIe users won’t want a significant increase in PCIe’s latency.
    The upshot of the switch to PAM4 then is that by increasing the amount of data transmitted without increasing the frequency, the signal loss requirements won’t go up. PCIe 6.0 will have the same 36dB loss as PCIe 5.0, meaning that while trace lengths aren’t officially defined by the standard, a PCIe 6.0 link should be able to reach just as far as a PCIe 5.0 link. Which, coming from PCIe 5.0, is no doubt a relief to vendors and engineers alike.
    Even with these changes, however, as previously mentioned PCIe 6.0 is fully backwards compatible with earlier standards, and this will go for both hosts and peripherals. This means that to a certain extent, hardware designers are essentially going to be implementing PCIe twice: once for NRZ, and again for PAM4. This will be handled at the PHY level, and while it’s not a true doubling of logic (what is NRZ but PAM4 with half as many signal levels?), it does mean that backwards compatibility is a bit more work this time around. Though discussing the matter in today’s press conference, it doesn’t sound like the PCI-SIG is terribly concerned about the challenges there, as PHY designers have proven quite capable (e.g. Ethernet).
    PCI Express Bandwidth
    (Full Duplex)
    Slot Width PCIe 1.0
    (2003)
    PCIe 2.0
    (2007)
    PCIe 3.0
    (2010)
    PCIe 4.0
    (2017)
    PCIe 5.0
    (2019)
    PCIe 6.0
    (2021)
    x1 0.25GB/sec 0.5GB/sec ~1GB/sec ~2GB/sec ~4GB/sec ~8GB/sec
    x2 0.5GB/sec 1GB/sec ~2GB/sec ~4GB/sec ~8GB/sec ~16GB/sec
    x4 1GB/sec 2GB/sec ~4GB/sec ~8GB/sec ~16GB/sec ~32GB/sec
    x8 2GB/sec 4GB/sec ~8GB/sec ~16GB/sec ~32GB/sec ~64GB/sec
    x16 4GB/sec 8GB/sec ~16GB/sec ~32GB/sec ~64GB/sec ~128GB/sec
    Putting all of this in practical terms then, PCIe 6.0 will be able to reach anywhere between ~8GB/sec for a x1 slot up to ~128GB/sec for a x16 slot (e.g. accelerator/video card). For comparison’s sake, 8GB/sec is as much bandwidth as a PCIe 2.0 x16 slot, so over the last decade and a half, the number of lanes required to deliver that kind of bandwidth has been cut to 1/16th the original amount.
    Overall, the PCI-SIG has set a rather aggressive schedule for this standard: the group has already been working on it, and would like to finalize the standard in 2021, two years from now. This would mean that the PCI-SIG will have improved PCIe’s bandwidth by eight-fold in a five-year period, going from PCIe 3.0 and its 8 GT/sec rate in 2016 to 4.0 and 16 GT/sec in 2017, 5.0 and 32 GT/sec in 2019, and finally 6.0 and 64 GT/sec in 2021. Which would be roughly half the time it has taken to get a similar increase going from PCIe 1.0 to 4.0.
    As for end users and general availability of PCI 6.0 products, while the PCI-SIG officially defers to the hardware vendors here, the launch cycles of PCIe 4.0 and 5.0 have been very similar, so PCIe 6.0 will likely follow in those same footsteps. 4.0, which was finalized in 2017, is just now showing up in mass market hardware in 2019, and meanwhile Intel has already committed to PCIe 5.0-capable CPUs in 2021. So we may see PCIe 6.0 hardware as soon as 2023, assuming development stays on track and hardware vendors move just as quickly to implement it as they have on earlier standards. Though for client/consumer use, it bears pointing out that with the rapid development pace for PCIe – and the higher costs that PAM4 will incur – just because the PCI-SIG develops 6.0 it doesn't mean it will show up in client decides any time soon; economics and bandwidth needs will drive that decision.
    Speaking of which, as part of today’s press conference the group also gave a quick update on PCIe compliance testing and hardware rollouts. PCIe 4.0 compliance testing will finally kick off in August of this year, which should further accelerate 4.0 adoption and hardware support. Meanwhile PCIe 5.0 compliance testing is still under development, and like 4.0, once 5.0 compliance testing becomes available it should open the flood gates to much faster adoption there as well.
    Gallery: PCI-SIG 2019 DevCon Press Briefing




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