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Thread: Anandtech News

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    #9791

    Anandtech: NVIDIA Releases GeForce 436.02 Driver: Integer Scaling Support for Turing,

    With this year’s Gamescom event now in full swing, the German games show seems to be taking on an ever-larger presence in the worlds of gaming and hardware. Along with a slew of games announcements (and a Google Stadia event tucked in between), NVIDIA is also using the show to launch an unexpected new GeForce driver. The first of the Release 435 family, the 436.02 driver adds and revises several features, including GPU integer scaling, a new sharpening filter for NVIDIA’s freestyling system, a rework of their pre-rendered frame limiter (now called Low Latency Mode), as well as 30-bit color for OpenGL applications, and the usual suite of game fixes and performance improvements.
    There are several different things going on in NVIDIA’s latest driver, and overall it feels a lot like a reaction to last month’s Radeon launch. In particular is the focus on low latency gaming (Radeon Anti-Lag), shader-based image sharpening (Contrast Adaptive Sharpening), and NVIDIA’s choice of games for performance optimizations (a couple of which are in our 2019 suite). Which is not to downplay the driver – if anything, it’s the most interesting driver out of NVIDIA in a long while – but it’s definitely laser-focused in certain ways on features that arch-rival AMD has just introduced or otherwise focused on themselves in the last month.
    Integer Image Upscaling At Last

    At any rate, let’s start with what I feel is by far the most interesting aspect of today’s announcement, which is integer display scaling support. This is a feature that gamers have been requesting for quite a number of years now – I’ve been asking for it off and on since early this decade – and the wheels finally began moving a bit earlier this year when Intel casually announced that they’d support the feature for their Gen 11 GPUs, aka Ice Lake. However with those parts not hitting retail until next month, it looks like NVIDIA is technically going to beat Intel to the punch with their release.
    Bundled in the new driver is NVIDIA’s take on integer scaling. Because the announcement for this driver has gone out in advance of the driver itself – that is due at 9am ET, after this was written – I haven’t had a chance to try the feature. But according to NVIDIA, it behaves as you’d expect it do: doing nearest neighbor scaling of lower-resolution images to an integer multiple of their original resolution, producing a sharp, pixelated image. In essence, you end up with a lower resolution image displaying on a higher resolution monitor as if it were a lower resolution monitor. Importantly, this mode is very different from traditional bilinear(ish) image scaling, which produces a softer, blurrier image without pixelization.
    Neither integer scaling nor bilinear scaling are always the right solution, but depending on the situation, each method can produce better results. NVIDIA has opted to focus their own blog post in talking about using integer scaling for pixel art games, where the pixelated look is very intentional, though these games typically (but not always) do integer scaling on their own to begin with.

    Simulated Upscaling @2x Zoom: Integer Scaling (Left) vs. Bilinear Scaling (Right)
    The more interesting use for the feature, I feel, is in gaming on 4K and 5K monitors, especially with sub-RTX 2080 class GPUs. This is because the high resource demands for 4K+ gaming are difficult for all but NVIDIA’s most powerful GPUs to keep up with (and even then…), which necessitates rendering a game at a sub-native resolution. Which in turn introduces the blurriness caused by bilinear upsampling. Integer scaling, on the other hand, would allow a game to be rendered at 1080p and then perfectly upscaled to 4K (2160p); it eliminates the pixel density benefits of a 4K monitor when gaming, but it retains the sharpness of native resolution rendering. It’s not quite a “have your cake and eat it too” solution, but especially for laptop users where 4K gaming isn’t a real option when 4K panels are, the potential is huge.
    What remains to be seen then is how well this works in practice, both with respect to NVIDIA’s drivers as well as games themselves. While NVIDIA can control the former, they have less control over the latter, so there are still subtle ways that games can interact poorly with integer scaling. In particular is UI/text size, since this is sometimes tied to resolution. Also, as NVIDIA notes in their own release notes, integer scaling doesn’t currently play well with HDR; and in fact the whole feature is still classified as being in beta, even if the drivers themselves are not.
    At any rate, the feature is being rolled out today for Turing owners – and just Turing owners. Specifically, the feature is available on GeForce RTX 20 series and GTX 16 series cards, but not NVIDIA’s prior Pascal (GTX 10) and Maxwell (GTX 900) series cards. According to NVIDIA’s announcement, the feature hinges on the “hardware-accelerated programmable scaling filter available in Turing”, however to be honest I don’t know how accurate this statement is, or how much of a blocker it might be for past cards. NVIDIA has a history of rolling out new features for their latest generation parts first, and then backporting the feature for older cards a few months down the line, so that may yet end up being the case here.
    Improved Image Sharpening for NVIDIA Freestyle

    Moving on, this driver release is also adding a new image sharpening filter for Freestyle, the company’s post-process filter ability that’s baked into GeForce Experience. While the company already had a sharpening filter in Freestyle, according to NVIDIA the new filter offers better image quality while also halving the performance impact from the prior filter. In practice, this latest addition seems to be NVIDIA’s counter to AMD’s new Contrast Adaptive Sharpening – itself a counter to NVIDIA’s Deep Learning Super Sampling – offering another, more generic shader-based approach that’s functionally similar to AMD’s.
    While I’ll keep DLSS comparisons to a minimum here since I haven’t tested the driver itself, DLSS support is still limited to a dozen or games – and while these are popular games, they are still only a portion of the overall gaming ecosystem. A post-processing shader-based approach, on the other hand, can work over most games (i.e. anything Freestyle works with), and most APIs, with NVIDIA enabling it for DX9 through DX12, along with Vulkan.
    As for how the image quality will compare to DLSS or AMD’s own solution, that remains to be seen. Post-processing alone cannot entirely recover data that has been lost from lower resolution rendering, and this is true for shader and deep learning-based approaches; native resolution rendering remains the best approach for image clarity. However, as far as post-processing goes, performance and image quality are variables on a continuum rather than fixed values, so there are tradeoffs and benefits going both directions, and depending on the game, the right algorithms with the right settings can produce some good results. Meanwhile, as image sharpness seems to be a battleground that both AMD and NVIDIA are interested in fighting over, I would full expect both of them to continue working on their algorithms.
    “Max Pre-Rendered Frames” Becomes “Ultra-Low Latency” Mode

    Also receiving a makeover in NVIDIA’s latest driver is their Max Pre-Rendered Frames feature, which again seems to be a response to AMD’s Radeon Anti-Lag functionality. The rarely noticed feature has been present in NVIDIA’s drivers for a decade – which, as NVIDIA likes to remind everyone, makes them first – and allows users to control how many not-yet-rendered rendered frames can be queued up to be rendered and displayed. In 436.02, the feature is being redeployed as Low Latency Mode, and it’s getting a new mode as well.
    Overall, the rechristened feature is being simplified some, both in name and in functionality. Along with what NVIDIA is undoubtedly expecting to be a more approachable name, Low Latency Mode will have just 3 settings – Off, On, and Ultra – which is down from 5 for the previous Max Prerendered Frames implementation.
    In terms of functionality then, while Off does exactly what it says on the name (which is to say nothing, leaving queuing up to the game), On and Ultra have a bit more nuance. On essentially compresses the previous incarnation’s settings down to a single label; instead of being able to select a queue size from 1 to 4 pre-rendered frames, On simply locks the queue at 1 frame. Ultra, meanwhile, is more -or-less new, and goes one step further by reducing the queue size to 0, meaning frames are submitted to the GPU on a just-in-time basis and no pre-rendered frames are held in reserve.
    Ultra mode potentially offers the lowest latency, but the flip side is that all the usual caveats to manually adjusting the rendering queue size still apply. The rendering queue exists to help smooth out frame pacing on both the display and rendering/submission sides of matters, however it costs latency to hold those frames. Even keeping the queue at a smaller size could throw things off, and just-in-time rendering is trickier still, since bad submission timing cannot be hidden. Which is why it’s an optional feature to begin with, rather than set to Ultra by default. Still, for latency-sensitive uses (and latency-sensitive gamers), being able to adjust the rendering queue size was (and remains) a useful feature to have.
    Meanwhile, perhaps the oddest part of all of this isn’t the first time that NVIDIA has offered Ultra mode. Until earlier this decade, NVIDIA’s drivers also supported a queue size of 0, which is why I’m not sure this entirely counts as a new feature. However given the tricky nature of queuing and the evolution of OSes, it’s also entirely possible that NVIDIA has implemented a newer algorithm for pacing frame submission.
    At any rate, as with its predecessor, Low Latency Mode is limited to DX9/DX10/DX11 games. Low-level APIs like DX12 and Vulkan give games very explicit control over queue sizes, so drivers cannot (or at least really should not) override the queue sizes on these newer APIs. On the plus side, unlike integer scaling, this feature is not being restricted to Turing-based video cards, so all NVIDIA GPU owners get access to it right away.
    OpenGL 30-bit Color, More G-Sync Compatible Displays, & More

    Wrapping things up, the 436.02 drivers also include some other feature improvements. Besides the usual slate of performance improvements – with NVIDIA focusing particularly on Apex Legends, Strange Brigade, Forza Horizon 4, World War Z, and Battlefield V – the new driver also incorporates support for 30-bit color in OpenGL applications. This ability was previously announced and rolled out for GeForce Studio Driver users last month, and like the name says, allows OpenGL applications to output images with 30-bit (10bpc) color to the GPU. Up until now, NVIDIA has purposely restricted the feature to its Quadro family of video cards, as a means of segmenting the product families and driving content creation users towards Quadro cards. Now it’s available for GeForce and Quadro users alike across both the Studio and Game Ready driver families, allowing for the use of wide color gamuts with all APIs.
    Meanwhile, on the monitor side of matters, NVIDIA has added another 3 monitors to their G-Sync Compatible program: ASUS’s VG27A and Acer’s CP3271 & XB273K GP monitors.


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    Anandtech: Dell’s Reveals OptiPlex 7070 Ultra: Putting a Modular PC In A Monitor Stan

    All-in-one desktop PCs have a number of advantages compared to regular desktop machines when it comes to dimensions, style, lack of cable clutter, and other. Their main drawbacks are tight integration that an AIO implies, particularly the need to fully embed a system behind a monitor or within the base of a monitor, resulting in AIO PCs living up the name. Dell, however, has decided to take a different approach with their new OptiPlex 7070 Ultra. The AIO system not only puts the "system" component in a new place – the "back" of a monitor stand – but Dell has made the system component modular, allowng system modules to be swapped in and out as needed, and has further done the same for the display panel as well.
    Dell’s modular AIO PC platform consists of several basic components: a compute module that packs CPU, memory, and storage; a display stand that can house the compute module; and a monitor with VESA 100 mounts. In fact, because the display stand is just a shell to hold and mount parts, the compute modules can be attached to any display even without a stand from Dell.
    The first compute module that Dell intends to offer is the OptiPlex 7070 Ultra, a 0.5-liter brick that looks like an external battery pack for a laptop. The laptop-sized module is based on Intel’s Whiskey Lake-U processor with up to four cores, UHD Graphics 620, and up to 25 W TDP that is cooled down using its own cooling system. The CPU is accompanied by up to 64 GB of DDR4 RAM (using two SO-DIMMs), an M.2-2230 SSD, and an optional 2.5-inch hard drive. The module has a GbE port, an optional Wi-Fi 6 adapter, and a side-accessible USB Type-C with DisplayPort, USB Type-A, and a 3.5-mm audio connector.
    Dell plans to offer a variety of OptiPlex 7070 Ultra modules targeting customers with different requirements: there will be versions with vPro-supporting CPUs, models with support for up to three displays, and so on. Furthermore, every component inside the module except the CPU can be upgraded, which may not be that important for OptiPlex’s target audience that buys directly from Dell, but which provides some additional flexibility for value-added resellers. One interesting thing to note is that some OptiPlex 7070 Ultra modules will come with proprietary power bricks (presumably due to power requirements), whereas the other will be powered via USB-C ports when attached to a display with power delivery.
    Other important parts of the modular AIO platform from Dell are display stands that can house the compute modules. Dell will offer two stands: one for entry-level machines with a display of up to 24-inch (e.g., Dell’s E-series), another for premium machines with up to 27-inch monitors (e.g., Dell’s U and P-series). The latter will be height adjustable, will be able to swivel the screens, and will feature a quick release button. Meanwhile, the stands are not vitally important for OptiPlex 7070 Ultra compute modules as the latter can be used separately with any displays.
    Being aimed primarily at corporate customers, Dell’s OptiPlex 7070 Ultra lacks optional CPUs with higher-performance Intel Iris Pro graphics, Thunderbolt 3 ports, and other features required by consumers or users or workstations. Meanwhile, corporate customers will certainly take advantage of modularity of the platform. For example, companies could deploy the new modules with existing displays, keyboards, and other peripherals.
    Dell’s OptiPlex 7070 Ultra modules will be available in the near future starting at $749.
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    Anandtech: Hot Chips 31 Keynote Day 2: Dr. Phillip Wong, VP Research at TSMC (1:45pm

    The keynote for the second day is from TSMC, with Dr. Phillip Wong taking the stage to talk about the latest developments in TSMC's research and portfolio. The talk starts at 1:45pm PT / 4:45pm ET. Come back then to read the live blog.

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    Anandtech: Hot Chips 31 Live Blogs: Intel 10nm Spring Crest NNP-I Inference Chip

    One of Intel's future 10nm products is the Spring Crest NNP-I 1000 Inference Engine. Today the company is lifting the lid on some of the architecture behind the chip.


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    Anandtech: Hot Chips 31 Live Blogs: Microsoft Hololens 2.0 Silicon

    The final presentation of Hot Chips 31 is from Microsoft, who will be lifting the lid of the silicon behind its HoloLens 2.0 product.

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    Anandtech: Hot Chips 31 Live Blogs: Intel/Tsinghua Xeon Jintide Security CPU

    Doing custom x86 CPUs is nothing new: presenting one at Hot Chips is new. Here we have Tsinghua University giving a presentation on Jintide, its custom solution built upon Intel Xeon technology.


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    Anandtech: Intel Launches Comet Lake-U and Comet Lake-Y: Up To 6 Cores for Thin & Lig

    Capping off a busy few weeks for processors for Intel, today the company is announcing the second half of their product stack for their low-power 10th generation Core processors. Dubbed Comet Lake, the sub-15W processors are based on Intel’s existing Skylake CPU architecture and 14nm process, and feature some new additions both improve performance as well as to address specific hardware needs. With up to 6 cores for the U series parts and 4 cores for the Y series, Intel is looking to further push the envelope on multithreaded performance in a thin and light laptop. The new parts will fill out Intel’s traditional U and Y families of processors, and Comet Lake will be sharing the 10th gen Core mantle with Intel’s 10nm Ice Lake parts, with OEMs pulling from both product families for their ultraportable laptops this holiday season.

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    Anandtech: ASUS Unveils the ROG Rampage VI Extreme Encore X299 Motherboard

    At the Gamescom trade show in Cologne in Germany, ASUS has unveiled its new high-end premium HEDT motherboard, the ROG Rampage VI Extreme Encore. Built on Intel's X299 chipset and for the anticipated arrival of the their Cascade Lake-X processors, some of the main features include support for up to four PCIe 3.0 x4 M.2 drives, Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax wireless connectivity, and an Aquantia AQC107 10 G NIC.
    Slotting in just below the ROG Rampage VI Extreme Omega motherboard in its current X299 product stack, ASUS has made some notable improvements to some of the core design aspects for the upcoming Intel 14 nm Cascade Lake-X processors. The extra lanes on the impending Cascade Lake-X processors have led ASUS to include four PCIe 3.0 x4 M.2 slots which feature support for VROC, meaning users can run high-performance NVMe drives in RAID for better performance and parity. Other improved aspects include a tweaked 16-phase CPU power delivery designed to optimize overclocking performance, support for up to 256 GB of DDR4-4266 memory across eight RAM slots, and dual NICs with an Aquantia AQC107 10 G NIC which has been paired up with the commonly used Intel I219-V Gigabit NIC.
    Looking at the aesthetics, ASUS has included a 1.77-inch LiveDash OLED display which can be customized with images, display POST codes and system information. There's also plenty of integrated RGB LEDs as well as additional headers so users can light their system up like a Christmas tree, or the LiveDash and LEDs can be switched off completely for a stealthier look. The ASUS ROG Rampage VI Extreme Encore features ASUS SafeSlot metal reinforcement on the four full-length PCIe 3.0 slots which operate at x16, x16/x16, x16/x16/x4 which disables the ROG DIMM.2 slot, or x16/x8/x4 with the DIMM.2 slot in use. The bottom full-length PCIe 3.0 slot is locked down to PCIe 3.0 x4.
    Overclockers are also catered for with a ROG Extreme OC kit with notable inclusions such as switches for LN2 mode, slow mode, and also includes a start, reset, safe boot, and OC retry button. On the rear panel is also packed with one USB 3.1 G2 Type-A, one USB 3.1 G2 Type-C, and eight USB 3.1 G1 Type-A ports Also included is a clear CMOS button, five 3.5 mm audio jacks and S/PDIF optical output powered by a SupremeFX S1220 HD audio codec, and two Ethernet ports controlled by an Aquantia AQC107 10 G NIC, with the other port powered by an Intel I219-V Gigabit NIC. There are two antenna ports for the Intel AX200 Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax wireless interface which also offers users BT 5.0 connectivity.
    The ASUS ROG Rampage VI Extreme Encore is set to cost $650 and should be available at retail in the coming months.
    Source: ASUS


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    Anandtech: Dell Unveils Updated XPS 13 with Intel’s 10th Gen Core CPUs & 4K Panel

    Dell has announced its latest-generation XPS 13 laptop based on Intel’s 10th Generation Core "Comet Lake" processors. Initially, Dell’s new 13.3-inch notebooks will come with quad-core CPUs, but starting from October the company will also offer the laptop with Intel's top-end hex core model.
    Being one of the most popular 13.3-inch notebooks on the market, the XPS 13 has a long history of evolution. The 2019 XPS 13 model 7390 has been completely redesigned both inside and outside. The new machines come in a CNC-machined aluminum chassis with a carbon fiber composite or woven glass fiber palm rest, so they look considerably different than their predecessors. Among other things, key peculiarities of the new XPS 13 are its thickness and low weight. The PCs feature a 7.8 – 11.6 mm z-height and weight of around 1.16 – 1.23 kilograms depending on the model, so the new laptops are among the thinnest and lightest 13.3-inch notebooks on the market.
    The new XPS 13 latops are equipped with a 13.3-inch LCD panel with thin InfinityEdge bezels as well as an 80.7% screen to body ratio. The display panels feature a 1920×1200 or 3840×2400 resolution, 400 nits brightness, a 1500:1 contrast ratio as well as Dolby Vision support on select SKUs.
    The latest Dell XPS 13 computers are based on Intel’s 10th Gen Core i3/i5/i7 Comet Lake-U processors. The CPUs are cooled down using a brand-new cooling system that relies on two fans, an ultra-thin vapor chamber, and GORE thermal insulation to ensure stable performance even under high loads.
    The XPS 13 systems can be equipped with up to 16 GB of soldered-down DRAM as well as a PCIe SSD up to 2TB in size. When it comes to connectivity, the XPS 13 7390-series features a Killer AX1650 Wi-Fi 6 + Bluetooth 5 controller, two Thunderbolt 3 ports, a microSD card reader, a 3.5-mm jack for headsets, and other options. As for multimedia multimedia capabilities, the new laptop has two 2 W speakers co-designed with Waves MaxxAudio, a far-field Cortana-capable microphone array, and a newly designed 2.25-mm 720p webcam located on top of the display lid.
    Dell says that the XPS 13 notebook is equipped with a 52 Wh battery that can enable operation for up to 19 hours on one charge (based on the Mobile Mark 2014 benchmark), but the real-world battery life is something that remains to be seen.
    When it comes to availability, Dell’s new XPS 13 with quad-core CPUs will be available starting August 27 at $899.99.
    Specifications of the Dell XPS 13 7390
    General Specifications
    LCD Diagonal 13.3-inch
    Resolution 1920×1200 3840×2400
    Brightness 400 cd/m²
    Contrast Ratio 1500:1 1500:1
    Color Gamut 100% sRGB 100% sRGB
    Features Dolby Vision Dolby Vision
    Touch Support with or without touch Yes
    Protective Glass Corning Gorilla Glass 4
    CPU Intel’s 10th Gen Core i3
    Intel’s 10th Gen Core i5
    Intel’s 10th Gen Core i7
    Graphics Intel's UHD Graphics
    RAM 4 - 16 GB LPDDR3 DRAM (onboard)
    Storage 128 GB PCIe 3.0 x2 SSD
    256 GB PCIe 3.0 x4 SSD
    512 GB PCIe 3.0 x4 SSD
    1 TB PCIe 3.0 x4 SSD
    2 TB PCIe 3.0 x4 SSD
    Wireless Killer AX1650 Wi-Fi 6 + Bluetooth 5.0 (based on Intel's silicon)
    USB 3.1 2 × TB 3/USB Gen 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C
    3.0 -
    Thunderbolt 2 × TB 3 (for data, charging, DP displays)
    Cameras Front 720p HD webcam
    Other I/O Microphone, 2 stereo speakers, audio jack
    Battery 52 Wh
    Dimensions Width 302 mm | 11.9 inches
    Depth 199 mm | 7.8 inches
    Thickness 7.8 - 11.6 mm | 0.3 - 0.46 inches
    Weight non-touch 1.16 kilograms | 2.6 pounds
    touch-enabled 1.23 kilograms | 2.7 pounds
    Launch Price Starting at $899
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    Source: Dell



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    Anandtech: Dell Launches Their Vostro 13 5391 Laptop: 10th Gen Core For Road Warriors

    Capping off Dell's spate of laptop updates, today the company also announced an updated Vostro 13 laptop for small business. The relatively inexpensive Vostro 13 5391-series feature a solid build quality along with numerous enhancements that will be appreciated by business users, road warriors, and even consumers. The new machines pack Intel’s 10th Gen Core processors and a discrete GPU into a thin and light package.
    The Dell Vostro 13 5391 comes in an aluminum and plastic chassis that is 14.9 mm thick, with total system weights starting from 1.18 kilograms, which is comparable to modern high-end notebooks such as Lenovo’s ThinkPad X1. According to Dell, the chassis is tested using 50 kinds of reliability, shock, and vibration programs to ensure its robust build quality. Furthermore, Dell will offer optional accidental damage and ProSupport services with this laptop. By default, the Vostro 13 5391 is equipped with a spill-resistant keyboard, whereas premium SKUs will come with a backlit spill resistant keyboard.
    The Vostro 13 5391 is based on Intel’s 10th Generation Core i3/i5/i7 CPUs (Comet Lake), and are joined by NVIDIA’s GeForce MX 250 GPU with 2 GB of GDDR5 VRAM, 4 or 8 GB of system DRAM, as well as an M.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 SSD with up to 1 TB capacity. The platform is enhanced with a hardware TPM 2.0 module, which will be appreciated by those concerned with security.
    When it comes to display, the mobile PC is equipped with a non-touch 13.3-inch Full-HD monitor with Dell’s TrueLife LED backlighting and wide viewing angles.
    Meanwhile for connectivity, the Vostro 13 5391 includes 802.11ac Wi-Fi, one USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C port with DisplayPort, one USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-A, one HDMI 1.4 port, a microSD card reader, a 3.5-mm connector for headsets, and a power plug. On the multimedia side of things the notebook has a Windows Hello-capable IR-enabled webcam, stereo speakers co-designed with Waves MaxxAudio, a microphone array, a Windows Hello-supporting fingerprint reader, and other things.
    The manufacturer does not make claims regarding battery life of the Vostro 13 5391, but it says that various SKUs will come with a 46 Wh or a 52 Wh battery.
    Dell will start sales of the Vostro 13 5391 this week with prices starting at $849.
    Related Reading:


    Source: Dell


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